Saturday, November 25, 2017

What is a "Traditional American?"

My website has a supporting page on Facebook named "Traditional Americans" on which I share many of the pieces that I write.

In addition to my own pieces, the page functions as a news and commentary aggregator. I present articles and pictures found around the web each day relating to topics that I feel would be of interest to followers.

Recently, the page cover picture was changed to reflect a Thanksgiving greeting. It included an American flag surrounded by a Fall season theme.

Accompanying the picture was a brief description of the page direction:
For folks with traditional American Judeo-Christian values. Conservative-leaning politically and socially. Pro-US military and law enforcement.
Some folks who apparently disagree with that message decided to comment.

"Wow so you are saying anyone who doesn’t agree with your beliefs is not American. That is exactly opposite of why we have America," said one.

"Actually, this post by this group is the antithesis of the founding fathers values. They, like Jesus, were the liberals of their time. For that, I am very thankful," said another.

"So no "Happy Thanksgiving" to anybody that is not in your camp?" said still another.

Of course, all of that missed the point of the post. That particular post, as would be anything and everything presented at the page, is not directed towards everyone. It is directed at fans of the page.

If you're not a fan of the page, if you don't agree with or care about what it stands for, then why follow it or comment on it in the first place? There are literally thousands of political, religious, and social pages available on Facebook. Follow and enjoy those that espouse your own points of view.




I understand that sometimes we feel that messages of hate or discrimination are being disseminated, and we want to stand up and challenge those. Still others genuinely enjoy a healthy debate. And frankly, there are those who disagree with a position or worldview, and simply enjoy being argumentative. 

I responded to each comment in what I felt was a strong but measured way. But these particular comments did give me pause to think. What do I mean by "Traditional Americans?" What does that term actually mean?

The page description was founded as, and remains today, exactly as highlighted above in that Thanksgiving post. 

The dictionary folks of Merriam-Webster define "traditional" as consisting of or derived from tradition, handed down from age to age, adhering to past practices or established conventions. Among that same sources definitions for "American" is a U.S. citizen.

United States citizens interested in sharing past practices or established conventions handed down from age to age in our nation. Folks who espouse American Judeo-Christian values and who are also conservative-leaning politically and socially. Pro-US military and law enforcement. Folks who are interested in and/or share those same interests. I would say that is a pretty fair definition of the intended audience for the page.




If you want to argue that your view of what would make someone a traditional American is different, you can feel free to do so. Facebook allows anyone to start their own page or group. Go for it.

Every piece here at my website is not geared towards political or social issues. However, the overall direction will always be in support of the principles and values described here. Even when appearing to highlight another direction, that will always be as a cautionary tale.

Jim Jordan is a U.S. Congressman from Ohio, who once stated: "For me, I think being a conservative means you are focused on all four key principles: strong defense, lower taxes, less spending, and defending traditional American values."

If you feel that you generally fit my definition of a "Traditional American", then I invite you to 'Like', follow, and share the Facebook page regularly. And please, do the same with this website, visiting regularly and sharing those pieces that you feel would be of interest to your own social media followers.

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